NEW ACQUISITIONS

The Betty Golde Smith Library

David Bachman, Librarian

These new additions to the Betty Golde Smith Library collection were selected by the Library Committee to support the educational programs and research interests of Institute Faculty and Students.  These books are also available as in-library reference materials for those members of the general public with interest in psychoanalytic topics.

February 2018

AMERICANIZATION

THE AMERICANIZATION OF NARCISSISM – ELIZABETH LUNBECK

American social critics in the 1970s seized on narcissism as the sickness of the age. But they missed the psychoanalytic breakthrough that championed it as the wellspring of ambition, creativity, and empathy. Elizabeth Lunbeck’s history opens a new view on the central questions faced by the self struggling amid the crosscurrents of modernity.

“A tour de force. Lunbeck brilliantly tracks the decades-long transformation of narcissism from a complex Freudian concept to a master term of 1970s social critique. Along the way, she masterfully delineates the ways narcissism has been used to explain such culturally freighted phenomena as homosexuality, women’s fashion, consumer culture, and youth revolt. This is social criticism at its best.” ~George Chauncey

 

 

 

One and ManyTHE ONE AND THE MANY: RELATIONAL PSYCHOANALYSIS AND GROUP ANALYSIS – JUAN TUBERT-OKLANDER

This book is a compilation of papers written between 2002 and 2012 on the subject of group analysis and relational psychoanalysis. From the author’s point of view, these two disciplines are really the two sides of the same coin, since both explore and use therapeutically what happens in the interphase between individual and collective ways of existence.

“Juan Tubert-Oklander achieves an almost impossible task: bridging the gap between psychoanalysis (especially relational approaches) and group analysis. He clarifies how what happens within people (intrapsychic, intrapersonal) cannot be explored without discussing what happens between people (interpsychic, interpersonal, and transpersonal).” ~ Haim Weinberg

 

 

Petrified EgoTHE PETRIFIED EGO: A NEW THEORY OF CONSCIENCE– ELIZABETH REDDISH

Due to the inherent contradiction in Freud’s concept of the Superego, there is a gap in our psychoanalytic understanding of how conscience evolves. This distinction is essential for the successful treatment of patients dominated by a harsh Superego and provides valuable insight into how contemporary society evaluates moral decisions. The Petrified Ego argues for a revision of psychoanalytic theory to include instinct as the primary form of morality. It makes the case that our earliest, infantile notion of ‘good’ and ‘bad’ is rather founded on experiences which have been ‘safe or ‘threatening’. More often than not, this is the basis of our moral judgement of others. It is only through direct challenge to these visceral values that beliefs independent of the survival instinct can be forged.

“Dr. Reddish’s work is a rich and valuable contribution both to psychoanalytic theory and clinical practice and to social theory. She is to be congratulated on her efforts to clarify and build upon a very complex, but very significant area of human development.” ~Bernard Barnett

 

Living PsychoanalysisLIVING PSYCHOANALYSIS: FROM THEORY TO EXPERIENCE – MICHAEL PARSONS

   Living Psychoanalysis: From Theory to Experience represents a decade of work from one of today’s leading psychoanalysts. Michael Parsons brings to life clinical psychoanalysis and its theoretical foundations, offering new developments in analytic theory and vivid examples of work in the consulting room. The book also explores connections between psychoanalysis, art, and literature — showing how psychoanalytic insights can enrich our lives far beyond the clinical situation.

“The psychoanalyst Donald Winnicott noticed that a regular outcome of psychoanalytic treatment was an enhanced sense of being alive… In Living Psychoanalysis, Michael Parsons takes up this idea with nuance, sensitivity and rich clinical detail. He shows us how crucial it is for human life itself that we be able to celebrate life via our capacity for feeling alive.” ~Jonathan Lear