NEW ACQUISITIONS

The Betty Golde Smith Library

David Bachman, Librarian

These new additions to the Betty Golde Smith Library collection were selected by the Library Committee to support the educational programs and research interests of Institute Faculty and Students.  These books are also available as in-library reference materials for those members of the general public with interest in psychoanalytic topics.

May 2018

 

Becoming FreudBECOMING FREUD – ADAM PHILLIPS

Becoming Freud is the story of the young Freud—Freud up until the age of fifty—that incorporates all of Freud’s many misgivings about the art of biography. Freud invented a psychological treatment that involved the telling and revising of life stories, but he was himself skeptical of the writing of such stories. In this biography, Adam Phillips emphasizes the largely and inevitably undocumented story of Freud’s earliest years as the oldest—and favored—son of Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe and suggests that the psychoanalysis Freud invented was, among many other things, a psychology of the immigrant—increasingly, of course, everybody’s status in the modern world.
As well as incorporating the writings of Freud and his contemporaries, Becoming Freud also uses the work of historians of the Jews in Europe in this significant period in their lives, a period of unprecedented political freedom and mounting persecution. Phillips concludes by speculating what psychoanalysis might have become if Freud had died in 1906, before the emergence of a psychoanalytic movement over which he had to preside.

 

Karl AbrahamKARL ABRAHAM: THE BIRTH OF OBJECT RELATIONS THEORY –  ISABEL SANFELIU

Together with Ferenczi, Karl Abraham was perhaps Freud’s most creative and devoted disciple. In this book, after outlining the socio-cultural context of the day, Isabel Sanfeliu examines Abraham’s life as a student, his family environment and his first steps as a physician and psychoanalyst.

“Abraham died young, in 1925, which is no doubt responsible for the neglect that has placed him, his work, and his originality in the shadows. It was an unfortunate fate that is now being rectified by this book, which restores Abraham to the principal place he has deserved for so long. Isabel Sanfeliu has created a really accessible conceptual biography, detailing the clinical journey of Abraham’s career from his early training at the Burgholzli Hospital with Eugen Bleuler and Carl Jung, to being the pre-eminent psychoanalyst in Germany in the 1920s. He was the destination for many younger people wishing to train with him in the psychoanalysis that was developing after World War One. Not least of those were the generation that included James and Edward Glover, Alix Strachey, and, of course, Melanie Klein.” ~R. D. Hinshelwood

SupervisionSUPERVISION IN PSYCHOANALYSIS: THE SÃO PAULO SEMINARS – ANTONIO FERRO

This book originates from a series of clinical supervisions that were held at the São Paulo Institute of Psychoanalysis by Antonino Ferro. Supervision in Psychoanalysis: The São Paulo Seminars reproduces the dialogues in the seminars that followed these supervisions in their entirety.

“Supervision in Psychoanalysis provides our field with a working model and a conceptual awakening. It offers a framework within which to productively transform current and traditional conceptions of analytic thinking, supervision and therapeutic process. This contribution represents some of the most creative psychoanalytic work, theory development, and therapy taking place in the field today.”  ~Gregory D. Graham

 

 

 

My Mother's EyesMY MOTHER’S EYES: HOLOCAUST MEMORIES OF A YOUNG GIRL – ANNA ORNSTEIN

Anna Ornstein is a Holocaust survivor. After emigrating to the U.S., she seldom spoke of the experiences she suffered while a young girl. Twenty-five years ago, at the family Seder gathering, her family asked for a story from her past. In an evocative, understated passage, she shared a bit of the tragedy she saw through the eyes of a child. Every year she has added to this tradition by sharing another chapter of the tragedies she witnessed and the small moments of grace in her survival. Through her family’s support, Orenstein gained enough strength to share her experiences in My Mother’s Eyes, in hopes of keeping the nightmare from ever happening again.

“…beautifully designed, delicately illustrated, impressionistic narration, which conveys a child’s acceptance if not comprehension of everything that is transpiring.” — Jewish Book World

March 2018

 

MutualityMUTUALITY, RECOGNITION, AND THE SELF: PSYCHOANALYTIC REFLECTIONS – CHRISTINE C. KIEFFER

Mutuality, Recognition, and the Self examines emerging trends in contemporary psychoanalytic theory and practice, highlighting intersubjective and relational models of the mind. Kieffer highlights the importance of mutuality and recognition in the development of the self, illustrating the impact of family, the larger group context, and the contribution of the analytic encounter.

This book is well suited for a wide variety of readers. [Kieffer’s] explanation of psychoanalytic concepts is straightforward and would be useful to most clinicians. It will be especially valuable to those psychoanalytic psychotherapists interested in self psychology and relational and intersubjective treatment approaches.” ~Michael B. Donner

 

 

MasochismTHE CLINICAL PROBLEM OF MASOCHISM –  EDITED BY DEANNA HOLTZMAN AND NANCY KULISH

The problem of how to understand and to treat masochism has plagued the vast majority of clinicians. The Clinical Problem of Masochism, edited by Deanna Holtzman, PhD, and Nancy Kulish, PhD, focuses on the common and difficult clinical problems posed by masochistic patients who are spread throughout all diagnostic categories. Foremost psychoanalytic clinicians in the field from various theoretical backgrounds demonstrate their approaches to working clinically with these problems. Each expert provides detailed clinical examples, making their approaches and suggestions come alive. This volume, unique in its varied clinical and practical focus, offers therapists of all theoretical persuasions ideas on how to think about and help individuals suffering from masochistic difficulties.

Clinicians will find many ideas about the meaning and function of masochism relevant to their work with patients. The book is filled with case studies that provide helpful examples of interventions that can free patient-clinician pairs from treatment impasses.” ~Judy L. Kantrowitz

 

 

 

TInterpersonalHE INTERPERSONAL TRADITION: THE ORIGINS OF PSYCHOANALYTIC SUBJECTIVITY – IRWIN HIRSCH

The Interpersonal Tradition: The Origins of Psychoanalytic Subjectivity, Irwin Hirsch offers an overview of psychoanalytic history and in particular the evolution of Interpersonal thinking, which has become central to much contemporary psychoanalytic theory and practice.

“In this book Irwin Hirsch offers a sweeping but still personal vision of the recent evolution of the Relational and Interpersonal traditions; it is a story crafted by an analyst who has both carefully observed and importantly contributed to these developments. Hirsch is a sensitive and unusually honest thinker, and he uses the history of his own journey through four turbulent decades to capture the ways in which interpersonal thinking has come to be part of the North American mainstream.” ~Jay Greenberg

 

 

 

RelationalsRELATIONAL FREEDOM – DONNEL B. STERN

“Relational freedom” is Stern’s own interpersonal and relational conception of the field, which he compares, along with other varieties of interpersonal/relational field theory, to the work of Bionian field theorists such as Madeleine and Willy Baranger, and Antonino Ferro. Other chapters concern the role of the field in accessing the frozen experience of trauma, in creating theories of therapeutic technique, evaluating quantitative psychotherapy research, evaluating the utility of the concept of unconscious phantasy, treating the hard-to-engage patient, and in devising the ideal psychoanalytic institute.

Donnel Stern’s Relational Freedom is a welcome contribution to the field of psychotherapy and psychoanalysis in which he reinvents the concept of emergence as the experiential component of the interpersonal field, and brings the concept to life in his many, in depth, clinical discussions. What I find truly remarkable about this book is that it offers a way of encompassing relational theory, field theory, Bionian concepts, and modern Freudian thinking, while so many others deal with these perspectives as if they are at war with one another.” ~Thomas Ogden, MD

 

 

February 2018

AMERICANIZATION

THE AMERICANIZATION OF NARCISSISM – ELIZABETH LUNBECK

American social critics in the 1970s seized on narcissism as the sickness of the age. But they missed the psychoanalytic breakthrough that championed it as the wellspring of ambition, creativity, and empathy. Elizabeth Lunbeck’s history opens a new view on the central questions faced by the self struggling amid the crosscurrents of modernity.

“A tour de force. Lunbeck brilliantly tracks the decades-long transformation of narcissism from a complex Freudian concept to a master term of 1970s social critique. Along the way, she masterfully delineates the ways narcissism has been used to explain such culturally freighted phenomena as homosexuality, women’s fashion, consumer culture, and youth revolt. This is social criticism at its best.” ~George Chauncey

 

 

 

One and ManyTHE ONE AND THE MANY: RELATIONAL PSYCHOANALYSIS AND GROUP ANALYSIS – JUAN TUBERT-OKLANDER

This book is a compilation of papers written between 2002 and 2012 on the subject of group analysis and relational psychoanalysis. From the author’s point of view, these two disciplines are really the two sides of the same coin, since both explore and use therapeutically what happens in the interphase between individual and collective ways of existence.

“Juan Tubert-Oklander achieves an almost impossible task: bridging the gap between psychoanalysis (especially relational approaches) and group analysis. He clarifies how what happens within people (intrapsychic, intrapersonal) cannot be explored without discussing what happens between people (interpsychic, interpersonal, and transpersonal).” ~ Haim Weinberg

 

 

Petrified EgoTHE PETRIFIED EGO: A NEW THEORY OF CONSCIENCE– ELIZABETH REDDISH

Due to the inherent contradiction in Freud’s concept of the Superego, there is a gap in our psychoanalytic understanding of how conscience evolves. This distinction is essential for the successful treatment of patients dominated by a harsh Superego and provides valuable insight into how contemporary society evaluates moral decisions. The Petrified Ego argues for a revision of psychoanalytic theory to include instinct as the primary form of morality. It makes the case that our earliest, infantile notion of ‘good’ and ‘bad’ is rather founded on experiences which have been ‘safe or ‘threatening’. More often than not, this is the basis of our moral judgement of others. It is only through direct challenge to these visceral values that beliefs independent of the survival instinct can be forged.

“Dr. Reddish’s work is a rich and valuable contribution both to psychoanalytic theory and clinical practice and to social theory. She is to be congratulated on her efforts to clarify and build upon a very complex, but very significant area of human development.” ~Bernard Barnett

 

Living PsychoanalysisLIVING PSYCHOANALYSIS: FROM THEORY TO EXPERIENCE – MICHAEL PARSONS

   Living Psychoanalysis: From Theory to Experience represents a decade of work from one of today’s leading psychoanalysts. Michael Parsons brings to life clinical psychoanalysis and its theoretical foundations, offering new developments in analytic theory and vivid examples of work in the consulting room. The book also explores connections between psychoanalysis, art, and literature — showing how psychoanalytic insights can enrich our lives far beyond the clinical situation.

“The psychoanalyst Donald Winnicott noticed that a regular outcome of psychoanalytic treatment was an enhanced sense of being alive… In Living Psychoanalysis, Michael Parsons takes up this idea with nuance, sensitivity and rich clinical detail. He shows us how crucial it is for human life itself that we be able to celebrate life via our capacity for feeling alive.” ~Jonathan Lear